Archives for posts with tag: Porcelain

I will be posting new work in my etsy shop all weekend. Please go check it out.

HP Bloomer Etsy Shop <-click here

I am editing a few images. Mostly of work from my firing last week. Here are a few images of pieces that are in my show at Willits Center for the Arts.

 

Hi all,

A few of you may have already read on my Instagram or Facebook pages that I am moving to California this August. In order to minimize what I have to move I have listed quite a few new and old pieces on my etsy shop. I will keep my shop open until August 3rd so get what you can now. My shop will reopen once I get making again when I’m set up in my new studio at the Cobb Mountain Arts and Ecology Project

Please go shop my etsy page:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/bloomer4

I was getting a little antsy to do something while I was bisquing work for my next firing so I though I would do some testing. It had been a while since I had done any tiraxial or quadraxial blends. I was hoping to find a new glaze or wash that would give nice magnesium matte surfaces but be a little runny. Instead I found some very stable glazes and lots of nice surfaces that I would consider testing more in the future. I thought a lot of these were nice enough to share and also wanted to share a little bit of the note taking that goes into each batch of test tiles. I try to photograph and take notes on every tile that I test. This includes a accurate photograph of the tile and notes that would tell me what the tile looks like without the photo. I think its important to be able to be articulate about the surfaces that we are looking at and communicate clearly enough to accurately discribe all of the intricacies that might be lost in the photograph. I am also including two photographs to demonstrate how the lighting and background are important to how we interpret the glaze itself. The clay bodies here are from Laguna they are Amadore (the darker of the two) and Half and Half (the lighter of the two). These tiles were extruded without cleaning the extruder between claybodies. The firing was gas reduction with first reduction started at cone 010 through 04 and then light back pressure maintained up through cone 9. The kiln was fired to a soft cone 10  and the damper opened for a minute at the end before the kiln was shut off.

Quadraxial Blend 2-25-15 Fluorescent Light Quadraxial Blend 2-25-15 Natural light

Quadraxial Blend 2/25/15

A- Talc / B- Wollastonite / C- Ball OM4 / D- Cornwall Stone

  1. Talc 70%, Wollastonite 10%, Ball OM4 10%, Cornwall Stone 10%
    1. Very dry white, stony, moderately transparent. Very stable and breaks around corners and edges well. Would make a nice sculptural surface. Feels like a 300 grit sandpaper.
  2. Talc 55%, Wollastonite 25%, Ball OM4 10%, Cornwall Stone 10%
    1. Also very stoney dry white glaze that shows all application flaws. Very stable and even has some cracking in the crevices. Will be good for sculpture as well.
  3. Talc 40%, Wollastonite 40%, Ball OM4 10%, Cornwall Stone 10%
    1. Satin glaze with moderate translucency. Very stable but thick application may cause matteness. Altering feldspar content may make it more reliable and even.
  4. Talc 25%, Wollastonite 55%, Ball OM4 10%, Cornwall Stone 10%
    1. Semi-gloss clear on first dip and satin on second dip. Very stable and moderate transparency.
  5. Talc 10%, Wollastonite 70%, Ball OM4 10%, Cornwall Stone 10%
    1. Very glossy clear glaze with some magnesium crystal formation causing some opaque areas. Looks like it could run if thick. Pools and breaks nice and evenly over textures. The underglaze pencil becomes a little blurry under the glaze. No visible crazing.
  6. Talc 55%, Wollastonite 10%, Ball OM4 25%, Cornwall Stone 10%
    1. a slightly glossy stoney matte glaze. Good translucency and seems to crackle where thick like in the crevices and corners of the tile. Very stable and shows all applications.
  7. Talc 40%, Wollastonite 20%, Ball OM4 20%, Cornwall Stone 20%
    1. Moderately glossy glaze with some satin tendencies on the second application. Glaze has good transparency and seems very stable. No signs of crazing.
  8. Talc 30%, Wollastonite 30%, Ball OM4 20%, Cornwall Stone 20%
    1. Very nice semi-gloss satin glaze with good fit (no crazing). Seems very stable and shows seem between first and second applications. Has good transparency and breaks over sharp edges well.
  9. Talc 20%, Wollastonite 40%, Ball OM4 20%, Cornwall Stone 20%
    1. Very glossy with the thin application and a good amount of magnesium crystal development on second application. Underglaze pencil has a little bit of blurring but is well defined (good transparency). Good glaze fit with no visible crazing.
  10. Talc 10%, Wollastonite 55%, Ball OM4 10%, Cornwall Stone 25%
    1. Glossy grey clear with good translucency. First and second dips almost completely blended together during firing. The second application area has some matteness and slightly decreased transparency. Glaze seems to pool and break well in textured areas. No signs of crazing or glaze defects.
  11. Talc 40%, Wollastonite 10%, Ball OM4 40%, Cornwall Stone 10%
    1. First application of glaze provides a satin sheen on the tile but shows all grog and clay texture. The second application is a creamy semi-transparent satin white. The glaze breaks well over edges and textured areas to reveal claybody and shows no signs of glaze defects.
  12. Talc 30%, Wollastonite 20%, Ball OM4 30%, Cornwall Stone 20%
    1. Very strong stable glaze thats nice and transparent. Glaze is semi-gloss on first dip transitioning to satin where application is thicker. The glaze seems very stable but doesn’t show second and first dip transition as much as others, there is still a line. No crazing or glaze defects evident. This would make potentially make a good functional glaze. Glaze pencil seems brighter under this glaze.
  13. Talc 25%, Wollastonite 25% Ball OM4 25%, Cornwall Stone 25%
    1. This tile is a semi-gloss satin glaze that seems to be very stable. There is medium transparency with a slight decrease on second application. The second application has a slightly increased magnesium matte quality. No glaze defects evident.
  14. Talc 20%, Wollastonite 30%, Ball OM4 20%, Cornwall Stone 30%
    1. Shiny glossy glaze with good transparency. Underglaze pencil has a little bit of blurring and some dispersion in the glaze. Second application is slightly less transparent and hides the clay body a little bit. The glaze also seems to break well over the edges of the tile and has a little bit of effect from the magnesium in the talc. Very stable with no evident glaze defects.
  15. Talc 10%, Wollastonite 40%, Ball OM4 10%, Cornwall Stone 40%
    1. Very shiny and glossy glaze with some magnesium effects on the second dip. The glaze has medium transparency on second dip mainly due to magnesium crystals. Underglaze pencil has some blurring but still looks good. Glaze breaks well over edges and seems very stable.
  16. Talc 25%, Wollastonite 10%, Ball OM4 55%, Cornwall Stone 10%
    1. Satin glaze with moderate opacity. First application might make a good thin wash depending on colorant response and is slightly glossier than the second dip. The second dip is more stain and more opaque but seems to break well over edges of tile. Seems to be very stable.
  17. Talc 20%, Wollastonite 20%, Ball OM4 40%, Cornwall Stone 20%
    1. Very nice gloss on first dip and satin on second dip. More satin where thick and seems to thin out over edges and get glossier at those points. The underglaze pencil is very stable under this glaze. Doesn’t seem to be substantially grey like some clears. No glaze defects evident and could have lots of potential.
  18. Talc 20%, Wollastonite 20%, Ball OM4 30%, Cornwall Stone 30%
    1. Very glossy on first dip with a subtle transition to satiny-gloss on second dip. The underglaze pencil is very stable under this glaze which has a good translucency. Seems to break well over edges and shows no glaze defects.
  19. Talc 20%, Wollastonite 20%, Ball OM4 20%, Cornwall Stone 40%
    1. Very glossy on first dip with a subtle transition to satiny-gloss on second dip.  Slightly more glossy than tile 18. The underglaze pencil is very stable under this glaze which has a good translucency. Seems to break well over edges and shows no glaze defects. Very good glaze could have lots of potential.
  20. Talc 10%, Wollastonite 25%, Ball OM4 10%, Cornwall Stone 55%
    1. Very nice clear glossy glaze with some slight magnesium effect where thicker. The underglaze pencil has some blurring but its still pretty crisp. No difference in first and second dip. Breaks well over edges. Very strong surface with no evident glaze defects.
  21. Talc 10%, Wollastonite 10%, Ball OM4 70%, Cornwall Stone 10%
    1. First dip gives a sheen and some gloss to the surface but doesn’t have any thickness. The second application is a matte glaze with some sheen that holds tight to the tile showing all surface texture. Could be used as a wash. Further testing needed.
  22. Talc 10%, Wollastonite 10%, Ball OM4 55%, Cornwall Stone 25%
    1. The first dip gives a glossy sheen to the tile and second dip is a semi-translucent dry satin-matte with gray and white tones. Very stable and shows all application particulars.
  23. Talc 10%, Wollastonite 10%, Ball OM4 40%, Cornwall Stone 40%
    1. First dip is a satiny sheen on the tile and second dip is a nice stain glaze with a good light gloss to it. the underglaze pencil shows very well under the glaze. The glaze breaks well over the edges of the tile and maintains a satin quality around the edge. Has some milky feldspar qualities where thick.  No evidence of glaze defects.
  24. Talc 10%, Wollastonite 10%, Ball OM4 25%, Cornwall Stone 55%
    1. Very glossy glaze on both first and second dip. The first dip shows the claybody very well and second dip is a bit whiter with some grey and green tones. Breaks well over the edges of the tile and has no evidence of any defects. Could have a lot of potential but may settle and require some suspension agent.
  25. Talc 10%, Wollastonite 10%, Ball OM4 10%, Cornwall Stone 70%
    1. Very shiny glossy glaze with strong surface. Glaze has nice transparency and doesn’t disturb the underglaze pencil. Very stable and first and second applications with smooth transition and no big differences in glaze effects for the two applications. Breaks well over edges and pools in texture well. No signs of any defects or crazing. Because of the high feldspar content this glaze could require a suspension agent to keep it from settling in the bucket.

Its been quite a while so here’s the summary of the last 9 months:

I wrapped up my residency at Arrowmont at the end of May and took a job as the Studio Manager/Director of Santa Fe Clay in Santa New Mexico. By the time I arrived in Santa Fe the Santa Fe Clay summer workshops were in full swing. Its been a pretty fantastic experience so far. I’ve had the opportunity to work with many notable artists last summer and am excited about this coming summer as well. I am very pleased to have been given so many curatorial opportunities at SFC and have assisted in curating a number of shows here over the last few months. Recently me and our gallery assistant, Natasha Ribeiro, co-curated 6 Under 36 which opens this Friday and is receiving some press both locally and from Ceramics Monthly. The artists included in the show are Emily Duke, Linda Lopez, Brooks Oliver, Peter Pincus, Adam Shiverdecker & Matt Ziemke. I will try to write more about the show as I live with the work once its installed. The basic premise of the show was to bring in younger ceramic artists whose work both Natasha and I found fresh and exciting.

Once I found a place in Santa Fe I was able to set up a studio and start working. While progress has been slow I’ve been able to get some work made. We recently finished a new soda kiln at Santa Fe Clay and did our first firing before the holidays. It feels good to know that I can soda fire my work once again. I will be documenting that work this week and hopefully sending it off to galleries shortly.

I am also in the process of getting a new website up. I started playing around with square space in November and then had my computer stolen and lost all of my images and portfolios. So I’ve been hunting down some of my higher resolution images from applications and residencies and am now ready to start the switch over to the new page.

When I arrived in Santa Fe I didnt have a studio to work in for the first 3 months and so I diverted my energies into glaze testing and have subsequently developed a whole new batch of glazes to add to my palate. I am excited to write about them, what I am looking for when testing, and how I evaluate the results for what I would like to turn into a article in the near future.

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So here is a short clip of me wadding pots and putting in the bottom shelf. This is the first soda firing I’ve done at Arrowmont. So far the kiln has been pretty easy to fire and adjust. I will be unloading on Wednesday and will do another video of the unloading. I am going to try to shoot a good number of the pots, if they turn out, before the A.I.R. open studios and post them before…but we will see how time is looking then.

Shot this short video today while working on some juice cups. This is the first time I’ve done anything with a time lapse app… I think next time I will slow down the frames per second. Enjoy!

So it has been quite a while since I’ve posted on here. I had wanted to do more testing on the cone 1 tests that I did for my last blog but that hasn’t happened. I hit a mental roadblock when approaching color at this temperature. All of the oxides which I am use to using for the cone 9-10 range behave differently at this temperature. And to make things more puzzling you can go out and buy specific colors, Mason Stains, to mix in glazes at this temperature range. This has never been a successful option for anything else I’ve done. This project has made me think about the way I approach glazes. I am not sure if it is a holdover from early  on when I would just look in  a book and pick a glaze and it either worked or didn’t or if it is akin to all of the testing that I’ve done in the cone 9-10 range. I usually have in mind what might happen and what I would like to happen with these tests but I never know for sure exactly what the outcome will be. After the tests come out of the kiln I usually pick out glazes and oxide combinations which I like and think I can use. My method has never been to choose the color first but instead to test the glaze and choose the color after.  There are so many mason stains that I am daunted by the choices. It has also become very clear that finding the right balance to make a satin or simi-matte glaze at this range is difficult without vast quantities of tests. Finding that middle ground where the silica and alumina ratio is just right has been excruciatingly difficult and unsuccessful. I am sad to say that I will be shelving this project for the time being.

I have however gotten to the point with my work which I feel that I could be successful with some small testing in any firing. I am looking at cone 6 as a future option. I have brought quite a few new techniques into my surfaces which I think have potentially made the soda firing irrelevant to my work. I do still love the dramatic surfaces and effects that I can achieve from the soda kiln but no longer think that my work is dependent on it to be successful.

After giving a surface design class at the Carbondale Clay Center a few months back I started incorporating more variety into my surfaces relying on my vision for the piece and not the effects of putting it in an atmospheric kiln. While my new work still draws a great deal of influence on architecture I have begun to explore other influences including interior & fashion design as well as some industrial and commercial design. I am now breaking each piece apart further creating divisions and patterns on the surface which relate to historic ceramics, mid-century painters and also the way that buildings weather as we use them. I have become fascinated by pattern and color on my forms. I am pushing myself to create challenging pots which excite my eye and conform to my aesthetic.

Here are a few of my latest pieces from my last two soda firings.

Enjoy!

ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage ImageImageImageImage

 

***Unfortunately the videos have been removed from Youtube and I cannot find alternative copies***

(if they do resurface or you find copies of these online then please let me know and I will repost)

This short 3 part series was just brought to my attention. The series focuses on the evolution of ceramics within the UK starting with neolithic work. I have only watched the first episode thus far, which covers neolithic up to Wedgewood. I will, however, be watching episode two this afternoon. I highly recommend this documentary to anyone who enjoys ceramics or history.

Ep 1.

Ep 2.

I look forward to the third installment of the series and hope to hear your thoughts and notes on the whole series.